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20130121
20130129
STATION
KQEH (PBS) 11
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English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
amphitheater they performed in in the south of france. this energy of getting the energy from the audience. there's a particularly favorite seat of mine. i've been sitting here for the last few weeks here. >> look at that. >> these seats literally are on the stage like you're in the most intimate of intimate clubs. this whole area, this whole zone in here can become a dance floor. >> there will be some boogying going on here. >> one hopes. ♪ >> this city was once the harlem of the west. a rich history of jazz and blues in the '40s and '50s. do you see this venue continuing that tradition or really building upon it and making it something else in the future? >> this city has had a great jazz history from the barbery coast to today. jelly roll morton, the man who claimed to invent jazz lived on market street for a little while. there was a great revival here. the earthquake magunes. the great clubs. the blackhawk. the keystone corner more recently. there is a history here. without that deep heritage, that deep culture heritage, we never could have been here. >> paying homage to those roots
today. i think all of us recognize that the energy has to come from the grassroots. that those of us who feel that the president needs to go further, and i think it barack obama were sitting here, he would say, yes, i like to go farther in terms of dealing with these issues of poverty and specific issues of the black community, but he would also say, you have to push me. that does not necessarily come from him deciding which are the greatest party as he has to deal with. just as johnson also said, look, i have a lot of priorities as president. if you love me to deal with is a voting rights issue, as king did in 1964 and 1965, you have to push me. king went out and helped stage the montgomery march along with lots of other people. that pushed johnson to act on the issue of voting rights. i think that we have to take on our responsibility as citizens to say, it is not enough to go to the polls every year and go. yes, when we go to the polls as african-americans, we are going to vote for barack obama as the better of the two candidates. but our responsibility than be caught -- then begins o
the administration, to destroy the energy of the government and to substitute the pleasure, caprice or artifices, to the regular decisions of a respectable majority. that's just what the republicans have been doing. since 2007 when they lost the majority in the senate, they mounted or threatened to mount nearly 400 filibusters, blocking everything from equal pay to equal work, job bills and reform. as a result, there are more vacancies on the federal courts today than when president obama first took office. but hold on. when democrats were in the minority and threatening to filibuster against george w. bush's judicial nominees, their leader, harry reid, had some kind things to say about the tactic. >> the filibuster serves as a check on power and preserves our limited government. right now the only check on president bush is the democrats' ability to voice their concern in this body, the senate. if the republicans roll back our rights in this chamber, there will be no check on power. the radical right wing will be free to pursue anything they want. >> now the shoe is on the other foot. i asked l
was 697 million shares on the big board. 1.8 billion on the nasdaq. the materials, financial and energy sectors topped the gainers, each increasing 0.9%. we are in the first of the three heaviest weeks of corporate quarterly earnings, and the focus was on chemical giant dupont today. the company earned 11 cents per share, less than a third what they were a year ago but still four cents better than estimates. dupont said it is seeing early improvement in its titanium dioxide business. that product is used as pigment in paint and other products. it's seen as an indication of overall industrial strength. on that note of optimism, shares were up 1.8%. this is the stock's highest price since issuing an earnings warning back in october. gold and copper miner freeport mcmoran led the gains in the materials sector, rising 4.6%. it is the world's biggest public traded copper miner with a big presence in indonesia. despite a drop in production there, fourth quarter earnings were up stronger than expectations. freeport called it an abnormal year at its indonesian mines. it expects production there
of its key suppliers. cirrus logic makes energy and audio semiconductors for apple. shares fell 10.8%. cirrus reported a big jump for its quarterly profits, but revenues were not as strong as wall street estimates. fellow apple supplier sky-works dropped 1.8%. wireless semiconductor supplier qualcomm saw more modest weakness, down just 0.8%. a big apple partner, a.t.&t. experienced the short term cost of selling all those iphones at a discount. but saw the growth slow of wireless new subscribers signing long term contracts. while earnings were up from a year ago, they were a penny per share less than estimates. these results are before a.t.&t. took a $10 billion accounting charge for pension and retirement plans. as the company battles verizon for wireless customers, it is falling further behind. a.t.&t. added 780,000 in the fourth quarter to a total of 70.5 million. but verizon added 2.1 million new subscribers in the same time period to 92.5 million. shares of a.t.&t. were down a fraction during the regular trading session, but gained about 0.5% to almost $34 per share in extende
it does make tough decisions on taxes, on spending, on energy policy, that america has some credibility that we got it more right than wrong. >> tell me about the lobbyists. who are these people? >> well, the problem with lobbyists, a lot of them come off the hill, a lot of them come out of congress. many members of congress leave the capital and go to k street. and it's a real reflection of how money has overtaken politics. and the real problem with that system is not the individual lobbyists. a lot of times they'll have legitimate points to present to members of congress. the problem is the amount of money that lobbyists represent. and what tends to happen in congress is that the concerns of those lobbyists, the concerns of amgen, become much more of the topic of discussion, debate, and resolution than the concerns of middle america, the concerns of the farmers. you know, in congress, we didn't even vote in the house on a farm bill. this is the first time in the history of this country where a house agriculture committee, on which i sat, but in a bipartisan vote, we worked together, p
the president does not spend a lot of time, effort, or energy on. >> do you agree with that. >> if you look at the deal with congress, they tried every other relationship, the obama, the reed-mcconnell relationship but it was the biden relationship that set it off. he know he how to run a meeting. he runs through them. that's how you run a meeting. he know he how to do that. >> recently the president at a press conference had to say i'm a friendly guy, i'm a people guy, but joe biden really is that. >> joe biden is. and joe biden's excesses of being a people person and gregarious and enormously approachable, have been very important to this administration and to what david pointed out what happened, particularly in the last couple of months. briefly, we always here this is the most important vice president in the history of the world. how does he rank as vice presidents go? >> he actually just may be -- this may be one of the rare occasions where the superlative applies. we heard it about dick cheney in a different way. cheney, you had a sense -- cheney was in many ways provided the intelle
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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